employee benefits

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS NEWSLETTER: November 2018

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9 ACA Employer Mandate FAQs for Employers and their Brokers

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is still in effect, despite efforts to dismantle it. This means its employer mandate is still in effect, and something employers and brokers can’t ignore. Plexus Technology Services, which delivers innovative technology reporting solutions to companies needing to report ACA information to the government, provides 9 ACA FAQs (frequently asked questions) about the employer mandate for employers and their brokers.

 

What is the ACA employer mandate?

Employers with 50 of more full-time employees must offer those workers and dependents the chance to enroll in minimum essential coverage under an employer-sponsored plan.

 

What is “full-time” under health care reform?

Working at least 30 hours per week or 130 hours in a calendar month. A special rule covers “seasonal workers” and others not continuously employed.

What is the look-back method for counting full-time employees?

Count the number of full-time employees during each calendar month and divide by 12.

What is an offer of health coverage?

Employees with 50 or more employees must offer coverage during a plan year. Employees must pay their share within 30 days of due date.

When is employer coverage considered unaffordable?

If the employee’s required contribution for self-only coverage exceeds 9.69 percent of their household income for the taxable year.

How are wellness programs treated?

If a wellness program provides medical benefits, it will likely be treated as a group health plan, subject to non-discrimination requirements.

How are stand-alone wellness programs treated?

If they don’t pay for medical benefits, they are not treated as group health plans.

Who handles the Summary of Benefits and Coverage?

The insurer prepares the SBC, and the plan sponsor distributes it. A self-funded plan prepares its own SBC.

What are the two employer mandate penalties?

No Minimum Essential Coverage: $2,260 per full-time employee.

Inadequate Health Plan: $3,390 per full-time employee.

Have questions regarding these ACA mandates and filing? Contact a Plexus Technology Services associate in Deer Park, Illinois at 847-307-6100, Chicago at 312-606-4800, Dallas at 972-770-5010 or Oklahoma City at 405-840-3033. We’re here to help and we’re happy to help.

Content provided by New Equipment Digest.

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS NEWSLETTER: August 2018

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There are over 42,000 opioid-related deaths in the United States each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)—a figure that has been rising steadily since the turn of the century. The opioid death rate is now more than five times greater than it was in 1999.

In addition to the skyrocketing opioid-related deaths, there are countless Americans who are still abusing

In addition to the skyrocketing opioid-related deaths, there are countless Americans who are still abusing prescription medications. This means employers must figure out how to best address this crisis with employees. That is where The Plexus Groupe can help.

The purpose of this toolkit is to help employers understand and deal with the opioid epidemic, create a healthier and more productive workforce, and reduce costs. This toolkit is not intended to replace the advice of a medical or legal professional. In many cases, you may need to contact a professional for assistance. However, this information can serve as a starting point for developing a meaningful opioid strategy.

What Are Opioids?

In the most basic terms, the CDC defines opioids as “a class of drugs used to reduce pain.” However, not all opioids are the same. There is a wide range of legal and illegal drugs that are classified as opioids. For example, Vicodin, a legal painkiller commonly prescribed to patients, is an opioid. By comparison, heroin, an illegally manufactured drug that has no medical use, is also an opioid. Both are killing thousands each year.

Opioids vs. Opiates

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These terms are used interchangeably by many who report on the opioid crisis. While this may be fine for a basic understanding, knowing the difference between opioids and opiates could matter to your organization’s plan administrator.

This toolkit uses the term “opioid” exclusively to include both categories of drugs.

Common Types of Opioids

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It should be clear by now that many drugs are considered opioids. Here are the names of some commonly abused opioids, with their brand names listed for recognition. These include prescription medications and illegal offshoots.

What Employers Can Do

The opioid crisis is not going away. Estimates show this epidemic costs the U.S. economy over $95 billion annually, with employers paying $18 billion of that themselves. And, these figures are only expected to rise. Employers need to do everything possible to combat the impact opioids have in the workplace.

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There is no silver bullet for this crisis. However, exploring new initiatives can help you develop your own strategy to best suit the needs of your employees. This section provides examples that may help you.

Understanding the Impact

Employers across the country are working to curb the misuse of prescription opioids. With more employees falling victim to addiction, employers are seeing lower productivity, higher health care costs and fewer qualified job applicants.

When so much of the workforce is at risk of opioid abuse, that can put a strain on benefit programs—especially health care costs. Overprescribing creates ample room for abuse, which can result in employers paying more for their drug plan than they need to be.

It can be hard to identify illegitimate use, especially with prescribed medications. Employers may need to try more unique approaches to curb opioid abuse. Addressing the problem with employees directly can be a good place to start.

Employee Education

Opioid abuse is not happening in a vacuum. Even if employees themselves are not using opioids, their lives may be affected by loved ones who are. This can indirectly affect their job performance and contribute to the overall crisis.

Employers should do their best to provide employees with educational materials to help them understand and take action against the opioid crisis. Lasting reform can only happen if individuals take charge of their situation. Educating employees is the first step.

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Consider the following suggestions when developing your own communication campaign:

Explain the Risks

Reminding people about addiction’s tragic side effects could help motivate them to abstain from or seek treatment. Directly facing the consequences of your actions can be powerful, especially when paired with other resources. Try putting up posters or sending information directly to employees that calls attention to the dangers of opioid misuse.

Encourage Employees to Speak With a Doctor

Sometimes employees do not think to speak to their doctors about opioid abuse. This could be because employees are worried about losing their prescriptions, or perhaps they do not know how their doctor could help. Regardless, a doctor is more qualified than your organization’s HR department to help with medical issues stemming from opioids.

Educate employees on the importance of speaking openly with their doctors. If they are worried about losing a prescription, explain that there are other effective ways to treat chronic pain. Most importantly, reassure employees that their doctors are there to help, not get them in trouble for misusing medication.

Promote Your EAP

Employee assistance programs (EAPs) can be extremely beneficial for your workforce. Traditionally, EAPs help with personal issues, like smoking cessation or stress management. However, they can also help with opioid usage.

Like any other EAP, a program geared specifically toward opioids can help employees deal with this debilitating addiction and put energy back into their job. Read more about EAPs in the following section.

Employee Assistance Programs

Because substance abuse and mental health issues can impact the workplace so significantly, many companies choose to offer EAPs. However, an EAP is only useful if it is tailored to your employees’ needs. In this case, employees need resources to fight their opioid addictions.

An EAP supplies professionals who provide counseling to employees and their families in a safe and private atmosphere. Generally, all the information disclosed will remain confidential, and no disclosure to employers will be made without written permission. Using an EAP will not jeopardize an employee’s job or chance for promotion, which are two repercussions many drug users fear. These factors lower barriers and can encourage more people to seek help.

The EAP makes a limited number of counseling sessions available to employees at no cost. Should an employee and his or her counselor decide that a referral to an outside provider is necessary, those costs will then be the employee’s responsibility.

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Consult your EAP vendor to determine what the payment structure looks like so you can advise employees on best usage practices.

Benefits of an EAP

An EAP not only helps employees, it helps the entire business. When employees are in good mental and physical health, the whole organization benefits.

Offering an EAP can put employees in touch with experts who can help start their treatment.

Opioid addiction should be treated like a chronic illness. Simply providing one treatment option will not help create lasting change. It takes time, energy and ongoing treatment to help reverse opioid addiction.

Speak with your EAP vendor to discuss adaptions that can better meet the needs of your workforce.

Have questions regarding opioid addiction in the workplace, this newsletter, or any other employee benefits matters? Contact a client service team representative from The Plexus Groupe in Deer Park, Illinois at 847-307-6100, Chicago at 312-606-4800, Dallas at 972-770-5010 or Oklahoma City at 405-840-3033.

We’re here to help and we’re happy to help.

Content provided by Zywave.

PCORI FEES DUE TUESDAY

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PCORI Fees, imposed by the Affordable Care Act to employers who provide health insurance to their employees, are due Tuesday to the IRS. The fee is the amount of money paid by employers who provide health insurance to their employees and imposed by the ACA to fund the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI).

The fee is required to be reported only once a year on the second quarter Form 720 and is based on the average number of lives covered under the policy or plan.

For most 2017 plans, the PCORI fee is set at $2.26 per covered life per year. The PCORI fee will be indexed yearly to national health expenditures until it ends in 2019.

For plan years ending from October 1, 2017 through December 31, 2017, the PCORI fee is $2.39 per covered life, with the fee due on July 31, 2018.

For plan years ending from January 1, 2018 through September 30, 2018, the PCORI fee is $2.39 per life, with the fee due on July 31, 2019.

Please refer to the following chart for the filing due date and applicable rate depending upon the month a specified health insurance policy or an applicable self-insured health plan ends.

Contact us

Have questions regarding the PCORI fee for 2018? Contact a Plexus client service team representative in Deer Park, Ill. (847-307-6100), Chicago (312-606-4800), Dallas (972-770-5010) or Oklahoma City (405-840-3033).

We’re here to help – and we’re happy to help.

The Plexus Groupe Announces Offering Work Shield Solution to Combat Harassment In The Workplace

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The Plexus Groupe recently announced providing Work Shield as a workplace harassment solution for its Employee Benefits clients. Work Shield and its ERISA-qualified Employer Harassment Prevention Plan (“EHP Plan”) is a new and innovative workplace harassment solution that works for everyone. This plan can be purchased and added at any time. The Work Shield solution provides an independent platform for employees to address -- and employers to prevent -- harassment issues in the workplace.

This program was created in part as a response to the #MeToo and #TimesUp movement.

Women, usually the victims of sexual harassment at work, are just no longer taking the abuse. They are finding their voice, speaking up and demanding change causing human resource departments across the nation to scramble to reform their ways and find new solutions.

The movement has resulted in more workplace complaints, companies fine-tuning their policies and procedures and even developing new prevention education.

As set forth by the EEOC, more than 33 million women have experienced sexual abuse and about half of those incidents took place at work. However, that number may be low because according to the EEOC, 75 percent of workplace harassment incidents go unreported.

Most victims of workplace harassment don't report the incident because of fear - fear of not being believed, fear of retaliation, fear of losing their job, fear of being ridiculed, and fear of having the incident “swept under the rug”, among other factors. Employees rarely feel safe and protected with their employer's current sexual harassment policies and procedures.

Work Shield serves a third party that provides a safe and secure conduit between all parties involved in a workplace harassment incident. An employee who is feeling harassed can use the Work Shield platform to report the incident on a HIPAA-secured portal – both anonymously and not.

Once an incident report is filed, Works Shield and its team of experts begin an investigation that is based on listening and understanding, while finding the facts surrounding the incident.

Within 45 days, Work Shield will provide an incident report of the findings and make a qualified recommendation to the employer regarding the incident – all with compliancy, confidentiality (as it relates to keeping the matter between only those applicable parties) and sensitivity as the key components to the determination and recommendation.

The existing system of handling workplace harassment issues is broken. The only resource for employees is to file EEOC charges and even lawsuits. Oftentimes, these employees win – BIG – due to an employer not appropriately handling, investigating and procuring the right solution. Since 2010, companies have paid out nearly $700 million in settlements to victims of workplace sexual harassment.

Workplace harassment not only impacts companies through legal costs, but impacts job turnover, sick and low productivity. It is estimated that companies spend an additional $327 million –on these three issues due to workplace harassment. In total, that’s over $1 billion dollars spent on workplace harassment in the past seven years.

But for the price of a cup of coffee per employee per month, the Work Shield platform is the key to preventing and resolving workplace harassment before it gets to a hefty and costly lawsuit.

Have questions regarding Work Shield? Contact a client service team representative from The Plexus Groupe in Deer Park, Ill. (847.307.6100), Chicago (312.606.4800), Dallas (972.770.5010), or Oklahoma City (405.840.3033).

We’re here to help — and we’re happy to help.

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS NEWSLETTER: July 2018

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The #MeToo and #TimesUp movement is fairly new but sexual harassment is not. Women, usually the victims of sexual harassment at work, are just no longer taking the abuse. They are finding their voice, speaking up and demanding change causing human resource departments across the nation to scramble to reform their ways and find new solutions.

The movement has resulted in more workplace complaints, companies fine-tuning their policies and procedures and even developing new prevention education.

Enter Work Shield and its ERISA-qualified Employer Harassment Prevention Plan (“EHP Plan”), a new and innovative workplace harassment solution that works for everyone and is offered by The Plexus Groupe. This plan can be purchased and added at any time. The Work Shield solution provides an independent platform for employees to address -- and employers to prevent -- harassment issues in the workplace.

As set forth by the EEOC, more than 33 million women have experienced sexual abuse and about half of those incidents took place at work. However, that number may be low because according to the EEOC, 75 percent of workplace harassment incidents go unreported.

Most victims of workplace harassment don't report the incident because of fear - fear of not being believed, fear of retaliation, fear of losing their job, fear of being ridiculed, and fear of having the incident “swept under the rug”, among other factors. Employees rarely feel safe and protected with their employer's current sexual harassment policies and procedures.

Work Shield serves a third party that provides a safe and secure conduit between all parties involved in a workplace harassment incident. An employee who is feeling harassed can use the Work Shield platform to report the incident on a HIPAA-secured portal – both anonymously and not.

Once an incident report is filed, Works Shield and its team of experts begin an investigation that is based on listening and understanding, while finding the facts surrounding the incident.

Within 45 days, Work Shield will provide an incident report of the findings and make a qualified recommendation to the employer regarding the incident – all with compliancy, confidentiality (as it relates to keeping the matter between only those applicable parties) and sensitivity as the key components to the determination and recommendation.

The existing system of handling workplace harassment issues is broken. The only resource for employees is to file EEOC charges and even lawsuits. Oftentimes, these employees win – BIG – due to an employer not appropriately handling, investigating and procuring the right solution. Since 2010, companies have paid out nearly $700 million in settlements to victims of workplace sexual harassment.

Workplace harassment not only impacts companies through legal costs, but impacts job turnover, sick and low productivity. It is estimated that companies spend an additional $327 million –on these three issues due to workplace harassment. In total, that’s over $1 billion dollars spent on workplace harassment in the past seven years.

But for the price of a cup of coffee per employee per month, the Work Shield platform is the key to preventing and resolving workplace harassment before it gets to a hefty and costly lawsuit.

Have questions regarding Work Shield, this newsletter or other employee benefits matters? Contact a client service team representative from The Plexus Groupe in Deer Park, Ill. (847.307.6100), Chicago (312.606.4800), Dallas (972.770.5010), or Oklahoma City (405.840.3033).

We’re here to help — and we’re happy to help.

Plexus Hires Christa Oldham as Vice President, Client Executive in Employee Benefits

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CHICAGO -- The Plexus Groupe hires Christa Oldham as Vice President, Client Executive in Employee Benefits. She will be based out of the national insurance brokerage and risk management consultancy firm's Chicago office. Christa brings nearly two decades of employee benefits consulting and brokerage success to The Plexus Groupe. The Plexus Groupe hires Christa Oldham because she has executed numerous high-level benefits initiatives. She has expertise creating, developing, and deploying strategies that positively impact clients and their employees. She will be responsible for personally managing a portfolio of clients.

“The Plexus Groupe hires Christa Oldham to fill a niche area with her strengths,” said John Dwyer, Plexus Senior Vice President. “Her impressive scope of experience and ability to build client relationships makes her a great addition to our firm. She will be a big part of our efforts as we continue to grow our presence in the greater Chicagoland area.”

WHO IS THE PLEXUS GROUPE?

The Plexus Groupe offers expertise in employee benefits, property and casualty, corporate retirement plans, personal lines insurance, human resources administration/consulting. It also offers benefits technology services and mergers and acquisitions. Additionally, the Plexus Global Network gives clients access to insurance placement in 130 countries around the world. The Plexus Groupe's headquartered in Deer Park, Ill., with additional locations in Chicago, Dallas, and Oklahoma City.

For more information on Plexus’s strategic insurance solutions, contact the firm at 847-307-6100 and ask to speak to a client executive or visit PlexusGroupe.com.

Plexus Introduces 2018 Summer Internship Program

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Deer Park, IL, April 18, 2018. -- The Plexus Groupe, a national insurance brokerage, is proud to introduce its Summer Insurance Internship Program. The Insurance Internship Program allows students entering their junior or senior year in Fall 2018 to apply. Interns will gain valuable real-world business and insurance experience in a workplace environment annually honored as one of the "Best Places to Work in Insurance" by Business Insurance magazine and Best Companies Group. The firm seeks a pair of interns for its Deer Park, Ill. office. It also looks to fill one position in its Dallas office. The paid insurance internship program runs from Monday, June 11 through Friday, August 3.

"We're excited for the launch of our insurance internship program," said Stephanie Martinez, Plexus VP of Human Resources. "It's a wonderful opportunity for students pursuing a career in insurance, a fast-paced field that employs three million nationwide. Also, a field that is undergoing considerable change because of technology. These are exciting times for our firm and we are looking forward to working with these students."

Internship Qualifications

In order to qualify for a Plexus insurance internship, candidates must have a 3.0 GPA or higher. Candidates will preferably major in Risk Management, Insurance, Human Resources, Business, or Finance. Employee Benefits will have two internships open: one in Deer Park, one in Dallas. One intern will work with Plexus's Property & Casualty team in Deer Park.

The Plexus Groupe will nominate interns for the Council of Insurance Agents and Brokers' Scholarship. This will give them a chance to win $5,000 towards their college educations.

Who is The Plexus Groupe

Plexus offers expertise in employee benefits, property and casualty, corporate retirement plans, personal lines insurance, human resources administration / consulting, benefits technology services, and mergers and acquisitions. In each of the last eight years, the firm has been honored as one of the "Best Places to Work in Insurance" by Business Insurance magazine and Best Companies Group. Headquartered in suburban Chicago (Deer Park), Plexus also has offices in Chicago (Loop), Dallas and Oklahoma City.

For more information on Plexus's 2018 Summer Internship Program, please contact the firm at 847-307-6100 and ask to speak to a Human Resources team member, or visit the firm's Career Opportunities page to apply.

The new tax law has changed the way employers can treat some fringe benefits. Here's what you need to know.

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The Plexus Groupe explains new fringe benefits tax law changes in the Tax Cuts and Job Act released by the IRS for employers. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently released the 2018 version of Publication 15-B, Employer’s Tax Guide to Fringe Benefits. This contains information for employers on the tax treatment of fringe benefits.

The new fringe benefits tax law, released in 2018, incorporates the new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act to the following fringe benefits:

→ Qualified transportation plans.

→ Moving expense reimbursements.

→ Employer-provided meals.

→ Employee achievement awards.

IRS Publication 15-B also discusses the new fringe benefits tax law for a variety of other benefits and includes key benefit limits for 2018.

Fringe Benefits: Tax Rules

A fringe benefit is a form of additional pay for an employee’s performance of services. Fringe benefits may include, for example, employer-provided cars, discounts on property or services, memberships in country clubs or other social clubs, and tickets to entertainment or sporting events. Fringe benefits are generally included in an employee’s gross income, unless a specific tax exclusion applies.

The Internal Revenue Code includes tax exclusion rules for certain types of fringe benefits. These include transportation benefits, meals, achievement awards, educational assistance and dependent care assistance. The new fringe benefits tax law excludes all or part of the value of certain fringe benefits from employees’ pay. In most cases, the excluded benefits are not subject to federal income or employment tax withholding, and are not reported on IRS Form W-2.

IRS Publication 15-B: An Overview

IRS Publication 15-B contains information for employers on the tax treatment of certain kinds of fringe benefits. The IRS updates Publication 15-B each year for tax law changes. The 2018 version of Publication 15-B is significant because it includes changes made by the new tax law.

Key provisions of Publication 15-B include the following:

Qualified Transportation Benefits

The new fringe benefits tax law, effective for 2018, does not allow employer deduction for qualified transportation benefits. IRS Publication 15-B clarifies that when an employer directly pays for qualified transportation benefits, through a bona fide reimbursement arrangement or through a compensation reduction agreement, their is no employer deduction. Thus, employers cannot deduct the wages that employees choose to contribute on a pre-tax basis for qualified transportation benefits.

IRS Publication 15-B does not address the unrelated business income tax (UBIT) issue for tax-exempt employers that provide transportation benefits.

While employers may no longer deduct payments for qualified transportation benefits, the fringe benefit exclusion rules still apply and employee wages may exclude deductions for qualified parking, commuter expenses and transit passes. However, the tax exclusion suspends qualified bicycle commuting reimbursements for tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2026.

Moving Expense Reimbursements

Also, the tax exclusion suspends qualified moving expense reimbursements for tax years beginning after Dec. 1, 2017, and before Jan. 1, 2026. The exclusion is limited to members of the U.S. armed forces on active duty who move due to changing stations.

Employee Meals

The 50% limit on food or beverage expense deductions also applies to these expenses that are excluded from employees’ income. However, food or beverage expenses related to employee recreation, such as holiday parties or annual picnics, are not subject to the 50 percent limit on deductions when made primarily for the benefit of employees, other than certain highly compensated employees.

Employee Achievement Awards

Employers may exclude the value of tangible personal property that is given to an employee as an award for either length of service or safety achievement. The new tax law clarifies that the tax exclusion does not apply to awards of cash, cash equivalents, gift cards, gift coupons or gift certificates (other than arrangements in which the employee selects from a limited array of items preselected and preapproved by the employer). The tax exclusion also does not apply to vacations, meals, lodging, tickets to theater or sporting events, stock, bonds, other securities and similar items.

Let Plexus Lend a Hand

Have questions regarding this newsletter or or other employee benefits matters? Contact a Plexus client service team representative in Deer Park, Ill. (847.307.6100), Chicago (312.606.4800), Dallas (972.770.5010), or Oklahoma City (405.840.3033). We’re here to help — and we’re happy to help.

Disclaimer and publishing credit: This Compliance Bulletin is not intended to be exhaustive nor should any discussion or opinions be construed as legal advice. Readers should contact legal counsel for legal advice. © 2018 Zywave, Inc. All rights reserved.

Reference-based pricing: an introduction

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Reference-based pricing is an employee benefits trend taking hold as a strategy aimed to minimize cost increases and improve health outcomes for their employees.

Here’s how reference-based pricing works: an employer, working in concert with an insurer, sets limits on how much it will reimburse a medical services provider such as a hospital or clinic for a certain medical procedure. The idea: the service provider can charge a rate that still ensures a profit for the service, but it’s not exorbitant. The rates can be tied to Medicare reimbursement, thus providing a commonly understood cost baseline.  The hospital or clinic has the benefit of having patients funneled its way, while the employer can realize some cost savings — and a little more cost certainty — regarding its medical spend. Thus, the advantage of referenced-based pricing for the employer should seem obvious.

For employees, referenced-based pricing gives them a window into the cost of medical services. For elective surgeries, they will have a chance to shop around for the right fit within their budget. And because the company will only allow spending to a certain point, employees will be incentivized to stay within those cost perimeters.

In a perfect world, reference-based pricing is a win-win for employers and employees.  Employers can reduce their health spend and exert some control over the vexing cost of medical services. Employees, meanwhile, participate in a system that gives them some choice and can help improve the firm’s bottom line. And with rising medical costs no small concern in corporate America, that’s a proposition that’s easy to get behind.

For more information on reference-based pricing, contact an employee benefits client service team member at 847-307-6100 (Deer Park, Ill.), 312-606-4800 (Chicago), 972-770-5010 (Dallas) or 405-840-3033 (Oklahoma City), or contact us via the Web. We're here to help -- and we're happy to help.

Administrative Services Organizations: An introduction

An administrative services organization (ASO) can be just what a company needs to address its human resources needs. An ASO can deliver cost savings, and it offers flexibility to an organization. What follows is an introduction to administrative services organizations.

For starters, it’s best to compare and contrast an administrative service organization with a professional employer organization (PEO).

In the case of a PEO, a company outsources its human resources functions to a third party — the PEO —through a co-employer structure. In this case, the PEO becomes the employer of record. The positives of this structure? The PEO, not the employer, assumes liability for matters such as workers compensation and employment matters. There is also the possibility of a reduced tax burden under this approach. (For even more on professional employer organizations, check out our recent blog on some of the trademarks of a PEO approach.)

However, in a PEO structure, a company surrenders a great deal of control. That’s the trade-off for the reduction in liability.

For companies seeking the benefits of outsourcing while maintaining more control, an administrative service organization might make more sense. Under the ASO model, a company remains the employer of record, but it also has greater ability to makes benefits choices, such as picking a health plan. Also, an administrative service organization costs significantly less to implement, with a savings of about 50 percent.

While the ASO strategy results in a company taking more liability than the PEO model, a firm might well decide that the benefit of choice outweighs the risk of passing on some of the decision-making power. The right answer will depend upon the firm.

For more on administrative service organizations, including transitioning to an ASO model, contact a Plexus client representative or reach out to us at 312-606-4800. You can also contact us via the Web at plexusgroupe.com.

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